Loading...

Computer Aided Draftsman/Designer 

Computer Aided Design (CAD) is the gateway to a career as an engineering technician, CAD designer, design technologist, detailer or draftsman.

Transforming ideas and concepts to reality

Computer-aided drafting and design technicians use software to create drawings and sketches ranging from simple parts to complex building designs or small electronics components.

CAD graduates have a working knowledge of project management and CAD as it applies to the mechanical, architectural and civil/structural fields.

Drafting is technical drawing to aid in the creation of a device, part or structure. Drafters use software to convert the designs of engineers and architects into technical drawings.

Most workers specialize in architectural, civil, electrical, or mechanical drafting and use technical drawings to help design everything from microchips to skyscrapers.  

Job and pay prospects

The median salary for a drafters is slightly over $54,000 or $26 an hour and the number of jobs available is expected to rise 7 percent from 2016-2026. 

Two years to a new career

Look to Illinois Valley Community College to meet your training needs.  The 63-credit hour AAS in Computer Aided Engineering and Design can be completed in two years and includes courses in mechanical drafting, electronics, technical math, MS Office, architectural CAD and engineering design concepts, among many others.

Hands-on training and experience

The modern CAD lab within IVCC’s new Peter Miller Community Technology Center offers students modern computers and the latest instructional software.

Students use 2D CAD and Solidmodeling software, including AutoCAD and SolidWorks. In addition, they will use leading edge 3D printers. Students will also gain first-hand on-the-job experience in industry through the AAS degree’sdesign technician internship.

Expert instruction

Program coordinator Dorene Data has over 20 years’ experience in CAD instruction. For information, visit www.ivcc/cad or contact Data at (815) 224-0221 or Dorene_Data@ivcc.edu.

 

 

Check out other careers in high demand in the Illinois Valley!

Computer Numerical Control Operator (CNC) 

Work in the high-tech world of robot operations, tool programing and machine operations!

High-skilled, high-demand

Computer Numerical Control (CNC) operation is a highly-skilled trade in the precision metal industry involving the use of computers to generate a tool path to produce complex parts. As manufacturing increases in complexity, CNC-machined parts are needed to meet that challenge.

CNC operators use machines to cut and shape precision products such as automobile parts, machine parts and compressors. Lathes and mills are examples of CNC machines. 

Job and pay prospects

The median salary for a computer-controlled machine tool operator is $44,000 or $21 an hour while a CNC machine tool programmer can expect to earn over $50,000.

Two years or less to a new career

Look to Illinois Valley Community College’s 29-credit hour CNC certificate to meet your training needs.  The certificate includes courses in machine blueprint reading, fundamentals of CNC operation, basic computer skills, manufacturing materials and processes, CNC milling, inspection, measurement and quality, technical math, CNC turning center and statistical quality control. Students write and run multiple programs throughout each of the four semesters.  Local workforce demand is high; IVCC instructors work closely with district industries to graduate students who meet their needs. 

Hands-on training and experience

IVCC’s modern CNC lab within the new Peter Miller Community Technology Center has seven full-size lathes and mills to provide students hands-on instruction. It is one of the premier training facilities in north-central Illinois. 

Expert instruction

CNC program coordinator Tim Bias has over 20 years’ experience in industrial maintenance and a master’s degree in technology. For information, visit www.ivcc.edu/imie or contact Bias at (815) 224-0261 or tim_bias@ivcc.edu.

Welder

Become a welder with the potential to go to work as a highly-paid pipefitter, ironworker or production manufacturer! 

A red-hot career

The time to act is now. In the production and construction industries, demand for skilled welders across the region has seldom been stronger.

What you’ll do

Welders, cutters, solderers and brazers:

  • Use hand-held or remotely controlled equipment to join or cut metal parts.
  • Fill holes, indentations, or seams in metal products

Pipefitters:

  • Install and repair pipes that carry liquids or gases to businesses, homes and factories.
  • Prepare cost estimates for clients.
  • Read blueprints and follow state and local building codes.
  • Troubleshoot malfunctioning systems, repair and replace worn parts.

Ironworkers:

  • Connect columns, beams and girders with bolts after verifying vertical and horizontal alignment.
  • Fabricate metal parts using blueprints.

Jobs and pay prospects

Production/fabrication workers (welders, cutters, solderers and blazers) earn a median salary of $19.35 an hour or $40,240 per year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The job market for fabricators is expected to grow at a rate of 6 percent with an increase of 22,500 jobs between 2016 and 2026.

Pipefitters can expect strong demand for their services. The BLS predicts job growth of 16 percent – “much faster than average” – from 2016-26 as more than 75,000 jobs are added. Pipefitters earn a median wage of $25.28 per hour or $52,590 a year.

Ironworkers take home $25.30 per hour or $52,610 per year. A “faster than average” job growth outlook for ironworkers of 13 percent is expected. 

Two years or less to a new career

Look to Illinois Valley Community College’s Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degrees and certificates for production (inside on production line) and construction welding (typically done outside) that are designed to be completed in two years or less.

Expert instruction

 

Welding program coordinator Paul Leadingham has over 30 years’ welding experience at Caterpillar and has led IVCC’s program for more than a decade. All IVCC instructors are CWI/CWE (Certified Welding Inspectors/Certified Welding Educators) and IVCC’s modern, 20-station lab is one of just four Accredited Testing Facilities (ATF) in Illinois.

Visit ivcc.edu/welding. Contact Leadingham at (815) 224-0319 or Paul_Leadingham@ivcc.edu.

The first step to registration is a call to the Records Office at (815) 224-0439 to schedule a mandatory welding information session.

 

Industrial Electrician

Launch a high voltage career by becoming an Industrial Electrician!

Industrial electricians are essential in manufacturing as they help ensure production components operate properly. With industry facing increased competition for workers and a growing number of retirements, demand for industrial electricians in the Illinois Valley is strong. 

  • Test, repair and maintain electrical equipment.
  • Clean, lubricate and adjust parts, equipment and machinery.
  • Examine parts for defects such as breakage or excessive wear.

Job and pay prospects

Most industrial electricians find full-time work with large employers, though some work as independent contractors. Employers include steel producers, electrical firms, motor vehicle manufacturers and mining companies.

Industrial electricians can expect demand for their services. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts job growth of 9 percent between 2016 and 2026.

Industrial electricians earn a median wage of $26 per hour or $54,000 annually (2017).

Two years or less to a new career

IVCC’s Industrial Electrician certificate can be completed in two years and consists of courses in basic industrial electricity, motors and controls, electrical wiring, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), industrial electronics, and industrial instrumentation.  

Hands on training

The program will teach you how to maintain industrial electrical systems by performing regular checks, analyzing performance, troubleshooting problems and performing repairs. You will learn to install, maintain, and repair electrical power, communications, lighting, and control systems in businesses and factories. 

Expert instruction

Electronics instructor Jim Gibson has 25 years’ teaching experience at IVCC and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in industrial technology from Illinois State University. For information, visit www.ivcc.edu/imie or contact Gibson at (815) 224-0453 or jim_gibson@ivcc.edu.

 

Maintenance Mechanic

Capture the skills you’ll need and earn a competitive wage by considering a career as a Maintenance Mechanic! 

Critically important maintenance mechanics ensure companies operate at peak production by ensuring heavy industrial equipment runs properly. With industries facing increased competition for workers and a growing number of retirements, demand for maintenance mechanics is strong. 

  • Identify problems using vibration and observation techniques or computer systems.
  • Disassemble machines, replace or repair broken parts.
  • Consult technical manuals for direction.
  • Ensure problem is fixed by testing.
  • Clean and lubricate machine parts.
  • Follow maintenance schedules.

Job and pay prospects

Industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers can expect robust demand for their services. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicted a 17 percent spike in job growth between 2012 and 2022. Maintenance mechanics can expect median wages of $23 per hour or nearly $48,000 annually (2013).  

Two years or less to a new career

Illinois Valley Community College’s Maintenance Mechanic certificate can be completed in two years and consists of courses in basic industrial electricity, equipment maintenance, safety, pneumatics, pipefitting, blueprint reading, motors and controls, hydraulics, rigging systems and welding. 

Hands on training

IVCC’s Maintenance Mechanic program will arm you with the skills to troubleshoot, diagnose and fix heavy machinery. Specifically, you will repair controls, gears, brake systems and chains for manufacturers, small shops and factories. Work is also available at government agencies, hospitals, schools, food production plants and mills.

Expert instruction

IVCC industrial maintenance instructor Tim Bias has over 20 years’ experience in industrial maintenance and a master’s degree in technology. For information, visit www.ivcc.edu/imie or contact Bias at (815) 224-0261 or tim_bias@ivcc.edu.

 

Start your education and training today!